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"We gladly feast on those who would subdue us" was taken. - Barnstorming on an Invisible Segway [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Marissa Lingen

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"We gladly feast on those who would subdue us" was taken. [Sep. 12th, 2012|10:39 pm]
Marissa Lingen
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(At the culmination of a long and rambling discourse about W. H. Auden, Lord Byron, Robert Frost, pameladean, and the deficiencies of the new library catalog system)
Me: But I thought it might amuse her, and so I shared.
timprov: Can we make that your Latin motto? And put it in a coat of arms?
Me: I'm fine with that. I will tell livejournal. Some of them know Latin.
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: blue_hat_guru
2012-09-13 04:39 am (UTC)
Which new library catalog system would this be?
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[User Picture]From: mrissa
2012-09-13 10:52 am (UTC)
Dakota County Library, local to where I live in the south suburbs of the Twin Cities, has implemented a new system. Among other things, you have to go to "advanced search" every time you want to indicate subject, title, or author. And even so the results are not alphabetical card-catalog standard, they're a half-assed relevance search for what it has decided you meant by typing in the exact author or title you were looking for. All I want is a button to have semi-permanently clicked that says, "Act like I mean what I say," because when I try to search for an author whose first name is John and they decide that "John" is the important key word and give me his works intermingled with other works by persons named John and biographies of persons named John (timprov: "and a biography of Tommy John...and books about people who have ever used the john...."), that is not useful.
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[User Picture]From: mamculuna
2012-09-13 02:42 pm (UTC)
That sounds like Overdrive, the one my library uses for electronic media. Often produces books that have the same letter in the title, anywhere. WTF...
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[User Picture]From: mrissa
2012-09-13 02:42 pm (UTC)
That's what mine uses for electronic media, too, and now the non-electronic catalog is acting very similar. Harumph harumph harumph.
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[User Picture]From: takumashii
2012-09-14 12:51 am (UTC)
Oh dear -- my library system is about to switch to that.

It seems to work pretty well for me, and The Management assures us that it will be easier for people to search it, and -- well. There is no such thing as "people," and "half-assed relevance search" is entirely the wrong thing in lots of cases.
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[User Picture]From: blue_hat_guru
2012-09-14 03:47 am (UTC)
But...but...libraries are where you want keywords to be particularly relevant! Argh.
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[User Picture]From: mrissa
2012-09-14 08:49 pm (UTC)
But only when you're doing a keyword search. Not when you're searching on Dorothy Sayers and do not want The Wizard of Oz.
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[User Picture]From: blue_hat_guru
2012-09-15 05:28 am (UTC)
By "keywords" I meant "just look for the dang words on the dang page in the place I specified" as opposed to the google/apple/everybody-else "we'll guess what you want because we're smarter than you."
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[User Picture]From: swan_tower
2012-09-13 04:47 am (UTC)
Very rusty, but I'll take a stab:

Eam delectet credebam, ergo communicavi.

I'm not at all sure whether I'm correct in using the subjunctive there (nor whether I have used the correct subjunctive), plus whatever other errors I have made. But it's fun to dust off the Latin, so I figured I might as well try.

(Which possibly ought to be my motto . . . .)
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[User Picture]From: davidgoldfarb
2012-09-13 05:25 am (UTC)
Not bad, but I think I like "puto" more than "credo". Also, action taking place at the same time or later than an imperfect-tense verb takes imperfect subjunctive. My stab at it would go something like:
Sed putabam fortasse id eam delectaret, ergo communicavi.
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[User Picture]From: swan_tower
2012-09-13 05:47 am (UTC)
Mottos are usually on the shorter side, which is why I erred on leaving out the "but" and "it" (and on reflection, I'd drop the eam, too). Fortasse helps communicate the conditional nature of the statement, which is where I wasn't sure whether the subjunctive was doing the job, but it might be optional if you're trying to be really concise. And I seem to recall that Latin -- when it bothers with word order at all -- generally puts the main verb at the end? But I could be wrong about that/confusing it with one of the other languages I've studied.

Good catch on the tense of the subjunctive. Heck, I would have forgotten that the imperfect subjunctive is built off the infinitive; I would have made it delectebat or something like that. It's been, um, twelve years since I actually used the language.

As for puto vs. credo, it felt to me more like the sense of the original was "I believed." I had it originally as cogitabam, but that's very much more "think" in the sense of (obviously) "I cogitated" or "reasoned," which is probably not what we're after here. Puto I'm less sure about; my dictionary glosses it as "reckon, value, estimate, esteem as, think, mean, consider." It could probably go either way.

But regardless, the short, motto-friendly form would (I think) be (Fortasse) delectaret credebam/putabam, ergo communicavi. "I believed/thought it would amuse, therefore I shared."

The coat of arms, somebody else will have to design. :-)
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[User Picture]From: shewhomust
2012-09-13 09:33 am (UTC)
OK, you've done the heavy lifting, so I'll tinker:

How about avoiding the subjunctive altogether, and going for the infinitive? Does that lose the sense of 'might', uncertainty? Given that we're talking mottoes, and terseness is all?

Eam delectare putans, communicavi

My Latin's a bit medieval, but hey, it's a motto!
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[User Picture]From: swan_tower
2012-09-13 09:43 am (UTC)
Medieval Latin, bah. :-)

If we're rephrasing like that -- which I think works for motto purposes; whether or not it works for Mris purposes is not for me to say -- then I'd put the whole thing into present tense. Delectare putans, communico: "Thinking to amuse [others], I share." Makes it more of a habitual thing, rather than a specific instance.
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[User Picture]From: mrissa
2012-09-13 10:53 am (UTC)
It's true, I do make a habit of the thing. :)
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[User Picture]From: jhetley
2012-09-13 11:43 am (UTC)
Shouldn't there be a hockey stick?
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[User Picture]From: moiread
2012-09-13 11:44 am (UTC)
I feel an axe should be involved somehow.
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[User Picture]From: mrissa
2012-09-13 12:42 pm (UTC)
These are all good suggestions. The fir is one of the shepherd trees from the dreams I have that used to be nightmares and aren't any more once I got my shepherd trees. (Birch and ash and fir, sometimes alder in mythically...odd...circumstances. In my waking life I am very friendly with oaks and maples and cherries and all sorts of things. But in my dreams, birch and ash and fir.)

Huh. Suddenly I think I understand why I am the only person in the house who doesn't have an animal of choice. Because animal was the wrong direction.

Also I think a loaf of bread. I think we will have to get selective here, or else it will be a very crowded shield.
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[User Picture]From: ckd
2012-09-13 02:27 pm (UTC)
Crossed hockey stick and axe, then in the four areas between them a fir tree, a spaceship, a loaf of bread (lussekatter, maybe?), and something for the remaining space. Hmm.

A book?
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[User Picture]From: shewhomust
2012-09-13 04:58 pm (UTC)
Good call on dropping the 'eam'. I like the rhythm of 'communicavi' (and I'd try to rationalise it as 'I have always...'). But indeed, let us lay the whole thing before mrissa and she shall take her pick!
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[User Picture]From: guppiecat
2012-09-13 02:24 pm (UTC)
"Utbay Iway oughtthay itway ightmay amuseway erhay, andway osay
Iway aredshay."



Oh, was that not the latin you meant?
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[User Picture]From: desperance
2012-09-13 09:34 pm (UTC)
I do love how any time anyone asks for a touch of Latin, there are always half a dozen ways to go. Latin: a river delta, not an obelisk.
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