Marissa Lingen (mrissa) wrote,
Marissa Lingen
mrissa

Fun, not mandatory.

It's a good thing International Bonbons and Movie Magazines Month was not meant to be literal, that's what I have to say. I ate a bonbon today (fleur de sel caramels, how I love you!), but it was small, and there were rather more of them left in the package than I thought there ought to be, and I strongly doubt that anyone has been sneaking in and adding chocolates to my stash. (I strongly doubt this because markgritter is out of town and timprov can't drive, and other people don't much have keys to my house. Otherwise I would consider Occam's Razor to strongly support the adding-chocolate notion.)

This month I've read two issues of Subterranean, one of Phantom, and one article from a back issue of Lavender from elisem (because she wrote the article, and because it came up in conversation, albeit scribbled conversation). But what I have on my desk yet is Asimov's, F&SF, two New Scientists, Scientific American, and Martha Stewart Living. (Guess which subscription I didn't buy for myself?) I am so far behind on periodicals. I never get this far behind on periodicals.

What I need is to not add "read periodicals" to my mental to-do list, much less my physical to-do list. They're there for fun. Fun is not a checklist. Fun is not a narrow window on the schedule between washing the dishes and sewing the buttons back on. It ought to be permeable, interleaved with other things, with "and have fun doing it" automatically appended to all sorts of the other things we do.

Which is an interesting connection to a post I'm not ready to make. But soon.

I was looking at things to add to my Amazon list for Christmas. What I wanted was some new yoga and/or Pilates DVDs. I kept running my head into a wall, though: I do not want to sculpt anything. If I did want to sculpt anything, it would be clay or possibly marble, wood, glass, dough, something other than me. I do not want to lose weight. I exercise because my body feels better when I do and because I have enough problems with vertigo and etc. without adding inflexibility, lack of stamina, etc. to them. What I want in a yoga or Pilates DVD is some fun and interesting stuff that keeps me moving and keeps a certain awareness of major muscle groups, so that I don't step wrong all of a sudden and wrench the heck out of my knee or etc. because my back has been really messed up and I never noticed until it needed to respond and couldn't.

None of the DVDs seemed to indicate fun at all. Nor interesting combinations or sequences. Nor...anything at all relevant to me, really. If I really hated some particular body part and wanted it transformed, apparently up to and including my spleen, I could find the right DVD for me. But I don't. Doesn't mean I think I have a perfect body, it means that the concept of some one body being perfect is not one that seems applicable to my life. (If there was such a thing, it would presumably differ from mine substantially: it would produce melanin when that might be useful, and it would be able to see things without wee plastic discs to help, and also it would never, ever fall over. But I don't think they sell DVDs to fix any of those things, so: not relevant.) There are the DVDs extremely focused on gentleness, but I kind of like a good sweat now and then. I just don't want to have to fork over money to someone whose goal is to sell FAT-BLASTERS!!!! to do it, and I can't really tell which of the "inner left thigh morning workout" DVDs might also turn out to be fun. I think this is one of those cases where genre fails someone because what they want is on entirely orthogonal lines to where the genre lines are being drawn.

My dad said, "You just want to have some fun that is funny." Because my dad is cute and has never really de-imprinted from Dr. Seuss. But he's right. (Don't think Pilates exercises are funny? Then you've probably never done my specialty, Poodle-Assisted Pilates. Good thing they say laughter is good for you, because oof.)
Tags: to done
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

  • 32 comments