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It’s not a bear hunt, but…maybe go through it anyway. - Barnstorming on an Invisible Segway [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Marissa Lingen

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It’s not a bear hunt, but…maybe go through it anyway. [Apr. 26th, 2016|08:55 pm]
Marissa Lingen
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That is: you can go over it. You can around it. You don’t have to go through it.


But sometimes you should.


Here’s what I’m talking about: the other week when I was having tea with some writer friends, one of them started talking about a problem she was having in her work. Let’s say that it was that people were finding her settings too generic. (It wasn’t. But let’s say that it was, because I like my friends to be able to discuss their problems without feeling like the whole internet will then become their confidante without their permission.) And the way she phrased this problem meant that the rest of us were helping her brainstorm ways to make a generic setting okay–the sorts of plots where a generic setting would not call attention to itself or bother anybody, the sorts of characters that could do their own personal, individual pyrotechnics and not make anybody go, “…does this person actually come from anywhere in particular? it feels like not.”


And as she was listening to us, she backed up and said no, what she actually wanted now that she was listening to us all was to make her settings less generic. How to work on that. And we immediately switched gears. Oh! You want to work on that, right! Let’s talk about ways to work on that!


There actually could have been three things there, though: 1) Her settings were not actually generic, but the unique stuff was not coming through. Work on how to bring out the unique stuff. 2) Her settings were generic. Does not actually care much about setting compared to other elements. Make other elements so amazing that people are too busy going, “wow, I love this protagonist,” or, “I could not wait to find out what happens next!” or, “What snappy dialog!” or whatever. 3) Her settings were generic. Try to make them less so.


#2 is risky in some ways–the good-enough story element–because on the one hand you have to admit that the odds that you will knock everybody’s socks off in every single aspect of a book are essentially nil. But on the other hand…deciding right up front that you don’t actually care if a major element is very good leaves you pretty vulnerable, especially if readers don’t like the basket you put all your eggs in. “I have really awesome speculative ideas!” you might say, and I might roll my eyes and say, “wow, this is supposed to be hard science fiction? because let me tell you how the physics of that totally doesn’t work. And also the characters are completely cardboard. Yick.” That has happened. That has happened more than once. On the other hand, the authors with whom this has happened have plenty of fans. So–priorities. It’s really hard to identify everything you might want to improve simultaneously, even if you’re just pleasing yourself and not cranky people who majored in something related to your idea. Sometimes it’s really, really okay to work around one or two things that you know are weaknesses for awhile.


Sometimes it’s time to dive in and try to get better at them.


You’re the one who gets to say which is which.




Originally published at Novel Gazing Redux

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Comments:
[User Picture]From: pameladean
2016-04-27 07:47 pm (UTC)
I find this is a repeated balancing act where they change the equipment and the rules and often the gravity when you aren't expecting it. There's always something that one is working on actively and something that one has put aside as not important for the moment, or as being good enough, or as not important to ME so SHUT UP WORLD, and something else one hadn't even thought of as an issue suddenly leaping out and looking extremely useful and yet, in its ranking in one's own list of skills, highly inadequate. And yes, moving those things into different categories, or being willing to do so and alive to the possibility, is a very good idea indeed.

P.
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[User Picture]From: mrissa
2016-04-27 10:22 pm (UTC)
Yes, it will shift under one. Sometimes maddeningly. Sometimes with all the right potential.
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